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Thread: google search engine command

  1. #1
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    Post google search engine command

    site: +www.open-realty.com

    enter that in. or any other site you like. its pretty cool command i found tonight.

  2. #2
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    Default

    What exactly does it do?

  3. #3
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    Default not 100% sure

    but it apears to list out sites that connect to yours from within google.

  4. #4
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by Caleb
    site: +www.open-realty.com

    enter that in. or any other site you like. its pretty cool command i found tonight.
    Hey guys check this out open-realty.+com" !

  5. #5
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    Default

    Caleb, for a Firefox devotee you are a bit behind the ball here. For some time there has been an extension for FF do do the same thing at all all of the big three search engines. Here is its homepage - opens them all in sep tabs all at once if you like - from the page. Here is the homepage - http://quirk.co.za/searchstatus/

  6. #6
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    Talking sweet.

    dang now i have to restart ff. its not that i love ff. its that i hate ie. peekabo slip opps what no tables no one showed me how to do this right. well here you go anyway i'm IE

  7. #7
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    Default

    Let's surround all of this with a little perspective. Money is the prime motivator of the business world. Two of the lead developers at FF left for cash offered by google. The truth of the matter is that without Microsoft the Internet would not be much more than the old arpanet. The personal computer would not exist in any meaningful fashion. While the Mozilla browser model is still more secure and standards compliant than IE one must keep in mind a few facts. The money behind Mozilla flows from AOL. AOL would not have a dime without MS. AOL has tried time and time again to place its browser in its software always failing and always reverting to IE.

    While the poor have always engaged in angry jealousy of the condition of the successful the poor consume and rarely create anything of value. The anti-Microsoft argument has been around for years. To this day this is the province of those who do not have to meet any production requirement or payroll. The reason IE is vulnerable is twofold. First it has the greatest footprint, so it makes a better target. Second, the legal system is woefully inept at dealing with those who create malicious code. Burglarizing a private home for $1k can get you 20 years while letting loose malicious code that costs productive entities tens or hundreds of millions will get you 6 months. Knowing that the rest of one's life would be spent behind bars would sharply decrease the security threat. The issue of "standards" compliance is a subjective one. If MS has a 90% market share who empowered a group of university types to set "standards"? It seems MS would be the standard. Just because some might not like the standards MS lays down does not mitigate the principle of defacto.

    On the other hand MS has a responsibility to its business customers who did not download the "corporate" edition of XP from Overnet/Edonkey who use the IE api to do things FF and the other "alternative" browsers have not even begun to think of offering. So the matter of the actual fact is while FF may offer a lot of "features" for the home user it is yet to be seen how it will hold up once it becomes large engough to become a tasty target. While your problem with ie lies in its quirky handling of css the fact is css is esoterica. While a surfboard retailer may see an increase in sales with some wild css design most productive work occurs in plain old html. That is the customer that allows MS to absorb the 47% of hot copies of their OS in circulation and the free browser.

    Being an avid fan and quite expert in several *nix flavors I still fire up XP and IE when I need to get down to the business of business.

  8. #8
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    Thumbs down with all that vast money

    i believe lazyness is the ending factor. "wild css design"? just basic funtionality to me. it will be interesting to see where ff goes with aol. what happens with ie7 and frankly ie users are my prime clients for computer repair. because ie does murder to computers.

    I personally use IE ever day when i design. to make sure nothing funky happens. if the peekaboo bug is caused by wild css design. i cant help but laugh. there is nothing new or extreme about 8 year old web standards. if microsoft thinks they have a big enough hold on the public then why should they care if their products dont produce. their strength is in numbers not equiptment.

    I run win2000 on all my machines. i may fool around with linux here and there but nothing special. i think Windows works fine.

    and yes. when Mozilla gets a big hold on the market and spreads far. it will be interesting to see how its vulnerabilities are dealt with.

    lets lock this thread up, no use arguing about what big companies do with their money.

  9. #9
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by skeeve
    What exactly does it do?
    That is one of Google's Advanced Operators:

    site: If you include [site:] in your query, Google will restrict the results to those websites in the given domain. For instance, [help site:www.google.com] will find pages about help within www.google.com. [help site:com] will find pages about help within .com urls. Note there can be no space between the "site:" and the domain.

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